Sheknows: Change Your Altitude, Improve Your Attitude

20 Oct 2016 If You Change Your Altitude, Will it Improve Your Attitude?

Sheknows: Change Your Altitude, Improve Your AttitudeThis article was first published at Sheknows as: 

Being 300 feet in the air can give you the change in perspective you need: Get out of your head by climbing and dining in tall monuments

Zig Ziglar said, “Your attitude, not your aptitude, will determine your altitude.” Changing perspective can bring a surprising new view of your situation. Where can you simply alter your altitude and improve your attitude?

Visit a famous landmark or a recommended restaurant, a new place can make a mark on your mind. Go high into the sky for dinner, watch the sunset and feel your cares float away. At approximately 300 feet (25 floors), you are taller than a Giant Sequoia.

Dessert at Atrio, Conrad Miami on the 25th Floor If You Change Your Altitude, Will it Improve Your Attitude?

Dessert at Atrio, Conrad Miami on the 25th Floor

Dine on the 25th floor at Atrio in the Conrad Miami in the business district on Brickell. At this property, you can watch both sunrise and sunset from its windows! Being high above the city can impact your disposition and improve your outlook!

At 300 feet, you are the same height as the Statue of Liberty. Have you ever climbed to the crown? Looking down from that height, people look like tiny ants! Do you want to get that feeling without reserving tickets? Enjoy a meal in Los Angeles at WP24 at The Ritz-Carlton. The city lights look dazzling from The Nest and you can have your tickets be for the Lakers, Kings or Clippers next door at LA Live.

Dinner in Dallas: If You Change Your Altitude, Will it Improve Your Attitude?

The view from SĒR Steak + Spirits at Hilton Anatole, Dallas

I have been to Miami, the top of the Statue of Liberty and I live in Los Angeles but I have not been to the top of Big Ben. It is on my bucket list.  A guided tour is available three times a day during the week and 334 stone steps lead you to the belfry. After you ascend, you will also be approximately 300 feet in the sky! I recently dined at SĒR Steak + Spirits at Hilton Anatole on the 27th floor which is the same height. Having my meal by the window, my mental state shifted as I listened to the marvelous live music and enjoyed my wagyu spinalis steak.

Why do people want to build to great heights? What happens when we change our perspective? “300 feet is about seven-tenths the height of The Great Pyramid of Giza. The Great Pyramid of Giza has an estimated original height of 430 feet. The Pyramid was the tallest structure in the world for almost 4,000 years — from its construction ca. 2551 BCE until it was overtaken by the Lincoln Cathedral in Lincoln, England, built in the year 1300.”

What do you want to build? We are all constructing ourselves everyday with our choices. Make sure that you step back from your situation so you can see all sides. Sometimes the best viewpoint is from the top!

Thank you to the Blue Bulb Projects; the measurements for this article come this page.

Lisa Niver was invited to explore dinner at great heights by Conrad Miami, Hilton Anatole and WP24. Thank you for helping me change my attitude and my altitude.

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Lisa Niver

Lisa Niver is a travel expert, writer, artist, entrepreneur, and on-camera host who has explored 99 countries. Niver has established a following through her written and video content, garnering over one million video views on YouTube, Amazon Fire Tv and Roku. She is the Adventure Correspondent for The Jet Set, the first travel based TV Talk show. She was a winner in the 59th annual 2016 Southern California Journalism Awards for her print column in The Jewish Journal. Niver is the founder of a top 100 travel blog, We Said Go Travel, that reaches more than 200,000 annually and is in the top 1/8 of the top 1% of all sites in the United States. In her tri-annual international travel writing competitions, she has published nearly 2000 writers from 75 countries. She was invited to the United Nations as a Champions of Humanity ambassador, to the red carpet at the Oscars with United Airlines and to New Orleans for a project with American Express and Starwood Hotels. Her recent stories include Dutch designer villas for Luxury Magazine, interviewing Fabien Cousteau for Delta Sky, skiing with the blind for Sierra, Ubud cremation ceremony for National Geographic and scuba diving in the Solomon Islands for Smithsonian. She also contributes to USA Today, Wharton Business Magazine, the Jewish Journal and is verified on Twitter and Facebook. Niver was a 2012 nominee for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching, a 2014 nominee for the Charles Bronfman Prize and a finalist in two categories for the 59th annual Southern California Journalism Awards.

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